Ducca

Ducca

Italian. Ducca melds Northern Italian favorites with modern Californian influences for an exquisite menu highlighting local ingredients, the bounty of the sea and aromatic spices. Described as an “urban Venetian mecca,” this stylish and beautiful restaurant features a warm and unique interior, and a terrace that welcomes casual dining by day, but transforms with communal tables and a roaring fire pit at night.

Forks were first used in the Middle Ages, but eating with one was considered scandalous. In the 11th Century, when a Greek princess wed the Venetian Doge, or Duca, Domenico Selvo, she brought her own gold fork, as part of her dowry, to use at the wedding dinner. After witnessing the princess use the fork, the church severely censured her, stating that the utensil was an affront to God's intentions for fingers. The princess died shortly after, perceived by the Venetian public as divine punishment. Thereafter the fork disappeared from the table for nearly 300 years, until it reappeared in Venice once again. Ultimately, the Venetians were the first in Europe to introduce the fork as well as the first to consider both the order of courses -- which presented an array of dishes -- and the relationship of the dishes served. Ducca is a Venetian mecca in the heart of San Francisco. -- OpenTable